9TH CIRCUIT COURT OF APPEALS – IMMIGRATION ORDER – DENIED

ORDER

Published in: on February 9, 2017 at 8:06 pm  Comments (2)  

IMMIGRATION LAW HAS BEEN PASSED SINCE 1952….THIS IS A REAL EYE OPENER!!!!!!

UPDATE 1-28-17

Public Law 101-649 101st Congress – Nov. 29, 1990

ACT TO amend the Immigration and Nationality Act

Although amended, some parts were repealed. TITLE VI—EXCLUSION AND DEPORTATION still applies.

 

1952 Immigration and Nationality Act, a.k.a. the McCarran-Walter Act

H.R. 13342; Pub.L. 414; 182 Stat. 66.

82nd Congress; June 27, 1952.

SUMMARY

Otherwise known as the McCarran-Walter Act, the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952 was meant to exclude certain immigrants from immigrating to America, post World War II and in the early Cold War. The McCarran-Walter Act moved away from excluding immigrants based simply upon country of origin. Instead it focused upon denying immigrants who were unlawful, immoral, diseased in any way, politically radical etc. and accepting those who were willing and able to assimilate into the US economic, social, and political structures, which restructured how immigration law was handled. Furthermore, the most notable exclusions were anyone even remotely associated with communism which in the early days of the Cold War was seen as a serious threat to US democracy. The main objective of this was to block any spread of communism from outside post WWII countries, as well as deny any enemies of the US during WWII such as Japan and favor “good Asian” countries such as China. The McCarran-Walter Act was a strong reinforcement in immigration selection, which was labeled the best way to preserve national security and national interests. President Truman originally vetoed the law, deeming it discriminatory; however there was enough support in Congress for the law to pass.

(Summary by Wade Johnson)  Click HERE.

AN ACT TO revise the laws relating to immigration, naturalization, and nationality; and for other purposes. Click HERE.

“Wouldn’t it have been interesting if, at some point during the presidential campaign, if one of the candidates asked, “Oh, by the way, has anyone in Washington, D.C., ever heard of the McCarran-Walter Act Of 1952?”

I did not know of this act until recently, but it has been a law for almost 65 years.

Here are the historic facts that would seem to indicate that many, if not most, of the people we elect to work for us in Washington do not have the slightest idea of what laws already exist in OUR country.

After several terrorist incidents were carried out in the United States, Donald Trump was severely criticized for suggesting that the U.S. should limit or temporarily suspend the immigration of certain ethnic groups, nationalities and even people of certain religions (Muslims). The criticisms condemned such a suggestion as, among other things, being un-American, dumb, stupid, reckless, dangerous and racist.

Congressmen and senators swore that they would never allow such legislation, and our president called such a prohibition on immigration unconstitutional.

As Gomer Pyle would say, “Well, surprise, surprise!”

It seems that the selective immigration ban is already law and has been applied on several occasions.

Known as the McCarran-Walter Act, the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952 allows for the “suspension of entry or imposition of restrictions by the president, whenever the president finds that the entry of aliens or of any class of aliens into the United States would be detrimental to the interests of the United States.

“The president may, by proclamation, and for such a period as he shall deem necessary, suspend the entry of all aliens or any class of aliens, immigrants or non- immigrants, or impose any restrictions on the entry of aliens he may deem to be appropriate.”

Who was president when this was passed?

Harry Truman. Who do you suppose last used this process?

Jimmy Carter, no less than 37 years ago, in 1979 to keep Iranians out of the United States. But he actually did more. He made ALL Iranian students, already in the United States, check in with the government. And then he deported a bunch of them.

Seven thousand were found in violation of their visas, and a total of 15,000 Iranians were forced to leave the USA in 1979.

So, what do you say about all of the criticism that Donald Trump received from the Democratic senators, representatives and the Obama Administration?

Additionally, it is important to note that the McCarran-Walter Act also requires that an “applicant for immigration must be of good moral character and in agreement with the principles of our Constitution.”

Therefore, one could surmise that since the Quran forbids Muslims to swear allegiance to the U.S. Constitution, technically, ALL Muslims should or could be refused immigration to OUR country.”

Authenticated at: http://library.uwb.edu/static/
U.S.immigration/1952_ immigration and_nationality_ act.html

Published in: on January 22, 2017 at 10:05 pm  Leave a Comment  

Former Maine Attorney General Jim Tierney Should Have Been As Concerned About Mainers When He Was A.G.

View: Most Revealing Video

Also view: The Quigley Formula

BDN reports ” Former Maine Attorney General James Tierney told a Portland audience Tuesday evening that the state’s economy will depend on its ability to attract — and accommodate — newcomers from foreign countries.

“We are so old that we have got to attract people to come to Maine from someplace else. I don’t care what color they are, I just want them to come here,” Tierney said. “We’re not talking about affirmative action, we’re not talking about doing people favors. We’re talking about doing ourselves a favor if we can figure out this diversity issue.”

Tierney joined Eva Millona, a former Albanian judge and executive director of the Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Coalition, as keynote speakers in a panel discussion about economic growth and immigration.

The talk was the first in a series of five such public discussions scheduled for Portland through June, and comes against a backdrop of an ongoing dispute between city officials and Gov. Paul LePage over the distribution of aid money to undocumented immigrants…. immigrants are 30 percent more likely to start their own businesses than native-born U.S. citizens.

“If immigrants succeed, we all benefit,” said opening speaker Tim Honey, president of the World Affairs Council of Maine.  “If immigrants don’t, we all pay the price.”

Tierney said that Maine’s aging population represents an economic crisis, and the state’s only chance to avoid economic ruin will be to welcome immigrants to replenish its population. “We are no longer a state with people looking for jobs, we’re a state with jobs looking for people,” Tierney said. “We have jobs in this state, which we’re losing because we do not have people to fill them.”

The former attorney general said Mainers must reject the “politics of fear” and embrace programs that create opportunities for immigrants.”

Read more HERE.

“If immigrants succeed, we all benefit.” “If immigrants don’t, we all pay the price.”

Hard working Mainers have “paid the price” through the “theft” of their small businesses and loss of livelihood through the failure of accountability within the State of Maine. Can we do “ourselves a favor” and put Mainers first….let’s start with accountability and restitution of the losses of livelihoods!! Then, perhaps, people will have trust that their hard work will not be “ripped out” from under them, decide to stay in Maine and start their small businesses. Brushing crimes “under the rug” does not move Maine forward…wake up!

Isn’t it high time that our elected officials listen to some real problems facing Maine’s economy? They can only learn by speaking with the people who have been “tossed out” of their system, rather than those who “control” their system.

World Affairs Council of Maine
Board of Directors, click here.
Maine International Resource Directory, click here.

Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) – Mission, click here.
CFR Membership Roster, click here.

Related: Police brutality during the tenure of A.G. Jim Tierney – Maine Exposed EPISODE 45, listen here.

President Obama’s Address to the Nation on Immigration

8:01 P.M. EST

“THE PRESIDENT: My fellow Americans, tonight, I’d like to talk with you about immigration.

For more than 200 years, our tradition of welcoming immigrants from around the world has given us a tremendous advantage over other nations. It’s kept us youthful, dynamic, and entrepreneurial. It has shaped our character as a people with limitless possibilities –- people not trapped by our past, but able to remake ourselves as we choose.

But today, our immigration system is broken — and everybody knows it.

Families who enter our country the right way and play by the rules watch others flout the rules. Business owners who offer their workers good wages and benefits see the competition exploit undocumented immigrants by paying them far less. All of us take offense to anyone who reaps the rewards of living in America without taking on the responsibilities of living in America. And undocumented immigrants who desperately want to embrace those responsibilities see little option but to remain in the shadows, or risk their families being torn apart.

It’s been this way for decades. And for decades, we haven’t done much about it.

When I took office, I committed to fixing this broken immigration system. And I began by doing what I could to secure our borders. Today, we have more agents and technology deployed to secure our southern border than at any time in our history. And over the past six years, illegal border crossings have been cut by more than half. Although this summer, there was a brief spike in unaccompanied children being apprehended at our border, the number of such children is now actually lower than it’s been in nearly two years. Overall, the number of people trying to cross our border illegally is at its lowest level since the 1970s. Those are the facts.

Meanwhile, I worked with Congress on a comprehensive fix, and last year, 68 Democrats, Republicans, and independents came together to pass a bipartisan bill in the Senate. It wasn’t perfect. It was a compromise. But it reflected common sense. It would have doubled the number of border patrol agents while giving undocumented immigrants a pathway to citizenship if they paid a fine, started paying their taxes, and went to the back of the line. And independent experts said that it would help grow our economy and shrink our deficits.

Had the House of Representatives allowed that kind of bill a simple yes-or-no vote, it would have passed with support from both parties, and today it would be the law. But for a year and a half now, Republican leaders in the House have refused to allow that simple vote.

Now, I continue to believe that the best way to solve this problem is by working together to pass that kind of common sense law. But until that happens, there are actions I have the legal authority to take as President –- the same kinds of actions taken by Democratic and Republican presidents before me -– that will help make our immigration system more fair and more just.

Tonight, I am announcing those actions.

First, we’ll build on our progress at the border with additional resources for our law enforcement personnel so that they can stem the flow of illegal crossings, and speed the return of those who do cross over.

Second, I’ll make it easier and faster for high-skilled immigrants, graduates, and entrepreneurs to stay and contribute to our economy, as so many business leaders have proposed.

Third, we’ll take steps to deal responsibly with the millions of undocumented immigrants who already live in our country.

I want to say more about this third issue, because it generates the most passion and controversy. Even as we are a nation of immigrants, we’re also a nation of laws. Undocumented workers broke our immigration laws, and I believe that they must be held accountable -– especially those who may be dangerous. That’s why, over the past six years, deportations of criminals are up 80 percent. And that’s why we’re going to keep focusing enforcement resources on actual threats to our security. Felons, not families. Criminals, not children. Gang members, not a mom who’s working hard to provide for her kids. We’ll prioritize, just like law enforcement does every day.

But even as we focus on deporting criminals, the fact is, millions of immigrants in every state, of every race and nationality still live here illegally. And let’s be honest -– tracking down, rounding up, and deporting millions of people isn’t realistic. Anyone who suggests otherwise isn’t being straight with you. It’s also not who we are as Americans. After all, most of these immigrants have been here a long time. They work hard, often in tough, low-paying jobs. They support their families. They worship at our churches. Many of their kids are American-born or spent most of their lives here, and their hopes, dreams, and patriotism are just like ours. As my predecessor, President Bush, once put it: “They are a part of American life.”

Now here’s the thing: We expect people who live in this country to play by the rules. We expect that those who cut the line will not be unfairly rewarded. So we’re going to offer the following deal: If you’ve been in America for more than five years; if you have children who are American citizens or legal residents; if you register, pass a criminal background check, and you’re willing to pay your fair share of taxes — you’ll be able to apply to stay in this country temporarily without fear of deportation. You can come out of the shadows and get right with the law. That’s what this deal is.

Now, let’s be clear about what it isn’t. This deal does not apply to anyone who has come to this country recently. It does not apply to anyone who might come to America illegally in the future. It does not grant citizenship, or the right to stay here permanently, or offer the same benefits that citizens receive -– only Congress can do that. All we’re saying is we’re not going to deport you.

I know some of the critics of this action call it amnesty. Well, it’s not. Amnesty is the immigration system we have today -– millions of people who live here without paying their taxes or playing by the rules while politicians use the issue to scare people and whip up votes at election time.

That’s the real amnesty –- leaving this broken system the way it is. Mass amnesty would be unfair. Mass deportation would be both impossible and contrary to our character. What I’m describing is accountability –- a common-sense, middle-ground approach: If you meet the criteria, you can come out of the shadows and get right with the law. If you’re a criminal, you’ll be deported. If you plan to enter the U.S. illegally, your chances of getting caught and sent back just went up.

The actions I’m taking are not only lawful, they’re the kinds of actions taken by every single Republican President and every single Democratic President for the past half century. And to those members of Congress who question my authority to make our immigration system work better, or question the wisdom of me acting where Congress has failed, I have one answer: Pass a bill.

I want to work with both parties to pass a more permanent legislative solution. And the day I sign that bill into law, the actions I take will no longer be necessary. Meanwhile, don’t let a disagreement over a single issue be a dealbreaker on every issue. That’s not how our democracy works, and Congress certainly shouldn’t shut down our government again just because we disagree on this. Americans are tired of gridlock. What our country needs from us right now is a common purpose –- a higher purpose.

Most Americans support the types of reforms I’ve talked about tonight. But I understand the disagreements held by many of you at home. Millions of us, myself included, go back generations in this country, with ancestors who put in the painstaking work to become citizens. So we don’t like the notion that anyone might get a free pass to American citizenship.

I know some worry immigration will change the very fabric of who we are, or take our jobs, or stick it to middle-class families at a time when they already feel like they’ve gotten the raw deal for over a decade. I hear these concerns. But that’s not what these steps would do. Our history and the facts show that immigrants are a net plus for our economy and our society. And I believe it’s important that all of us have this debate without impugning each other’s character.

Because for all the back and forth of Washington, we have to remember that this debate is about something bigger. It’s about who we are as a country, and who we want to be for future generations.

Are we a nation that tolerates the hypocrisy of a system where workers who pick our fruit and make our beds never have a chance to get right with the law? Or are we a nation that gives them a chance to make amends, take responsibility, and give their kids a better future?

Are we a nation that accepts the cruelty of ripping children from their parents’ arms? Or are we a nation that values families, and works together to keep them together?

Are we a nation that educates the world’s best and brightest in our universities, only to send them home to create businesses in countries that compete against us? Or are we a nation that encourages them to stay and create jobs here, create businesses here, create industries right here in America?

That’s what this debate is all about. We need more than politics as usual when it comes to immigration. We need reasoned, thoughtful, compassionate debate that focuses on our hopes, not our fears. I know the politics of this issue are tough. But let me tell you why I have come to feel so strongly about it.

Over the past few years, I have seen the determination of immigrant fathers who worked two or three jobs without taking a dime from the government, and at risk any moment of losing it all, just to build a better life for their kids. I’ve seen the heartbreak and anxiety of children whose mothers might be taken away from them just because they didn’t have the right papers. I’ve seen the courage of students who, except for the circumstances of their birth, are as American as Malia or Sasha; students who bravely come out as undocumented in hopes they could make a difference in the country they love.

These people –- our neighbors, our classmates, our friends –- they did not come here in search of a free ride or an easy life. They came to work, and study, and serve in our military, and above all, contribute to America’s success.

Tomorrow, I’ll travel to Las Vegas and meet with some of these students, including a young woman named Astrid Silva. Astrid was brought to America when she was four years old. Her only possessions were a cross, her doll, and the frilly dress she had on. When she started school, she didn’t speak any English. She caught up to other kids by reading newspapers and watching PBS, and she became a good student. Her father worked in landscaping. Her mom cleaned other people’s homes. They wouldn’t let Astrid apply to a technology magnet school, not because they didn’t love her, but because they were afraid the paperwork would out her as an undocumented immigrant –- so she applied behind their back and got in. Still, she mostly lived in the shadows –- until her grandmother, who visited every year from Mexico, passed away, and she couldn’t travel to the funeral without risk of being found out and deported. It was around that time she decided to begin advocating for herself and others like her, and today, Astrid Silva is a college student working on her third degree.

Are we a nation that kicks out a striving, hopeful immigrant like Astrid, or are we a nation that finds a way to welcome her in? Scripture tells us that we shall not oppress a stranger, for we know the heart of a stranger –- we were strangers once, too.

My fellow Americans, we are and always will be a nation of immigrants. We were strangers once, too. And whether our forebears were strangers who crossed the Atlantic, or the Pacific, or the Rio Grande, we are here only because this country welcomed them in, and taught them that to be an American is about something more than what we look like, or what our last names are, or how we worship. What makes us Americans is our shared commitment to an ideal -– that all of us are created equal, and all of us have the chance to make of our lives what we will.

That’s the country our parents and grandparents and generations before them built for us. That’s the tradition we must uphold. That’s the legacy we must leave for those who are yet to come.

Thank you. God bless you. And God bless this country we love.”

END
8:16 P.M. EST

Source: The White House – Office of the Press Secretary

Published in: on November 21, 2014 at 9:14 pm  Leave a Comment  

Hundreds Of Captured Illegal Aliens Being Flown To Southern California For Processing

“The Border Patrol will fly Central American migrants from south Texas to California for processing as the government seeks to ease the workload on agents at the nation’s busiest corridor for illegal crossings.

There will be two flights Monday with 140 passengers each — one bound for San Diego and one for El Centro, about 100 miles east of San Diego, said Paul Beeson, chief of the Border Patrol’s San Diego sector. The two flights were expected to continue every three days, but it’s unclear for how long.

The Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency will decide whether the Central Americans remain in custody or are released while they are in deportation proceedings. ICE spokeswoman Lauren Mack declined to comment on how the agency will respond.

The Border Patrol flew a large number of families from Texas to Tucson, Arizona, over Memorial Day weekend, drawing criticism from Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer when ICE later dropped them off at Greyhound bus stations there.

U.S. border authorities have detained more than 39,000 adults with young children from October through May. A number have been released but the Department of Homeland Security has refused to say how many and whether they failed to appear in immigration court.”  Read more HERE.

Study: California Pays $25.3 Billion Per Year for Illegal Aliens and The Fiscal Burden of Illegal Immigration on California Taxpayers (2014), read more HERE.

So goes California……

Published in: on June 22, 2014 at 6:59 pm  Leave a Comment  
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