UNESCO Common Core 1984 (Teacher Training)

Original document courtesy Cherilyn Eagar, click here.

Below are Charlotte Iserbyt’s transcribed notes (a small part of original document Cherilyn sent through.)

CORE IN THE TRAINING OF VARIOUS CATEGORIES OF EDUCATIONAL PERSONNEL.

NOVEMBER 1984

UNESCO – J.C. Pauwert

COMMON CORE

Page 2. The approach takes precedence over the subject to which it is applied.”…consequently what those responsible for training should learn is not so much to communicate subject matter and fix it in their students’ education as to be able to train their students in the use of the different cognitive processes common to all branches.”

1.4 Comparable considerations have been developed by M.L. Goldschmid (2): the teaching of subject matter, whose purpose is not the overall education of the individual, but the simple transmission of theoretical knowledge, is outdated. Admittedly, knowledge of the subject is an indisputable prerequisite, but it is not sufficient. (?) of subject matter is no longer appropriate.

The pre-eminence of knowledge, considered as ? for a teacher in a particular subject is giving way to pedagogic know-how and situation mastery which must be learned. The training of teachers must help them know themselves better, to realize the conditions of their own teaching behavior and the effects of these behaviors on the activities of their pupils, to situate the needs and interests of those they teach and to practice the profession in the context of institutional and social reality.

To remedy this state of affairs we propose first of all to establish a Taxonomy of Teacher Behavior on the basis of the most essential parameter of the educational process…this taxonomy is composed of basic behavioral patterns independent of any particular subject matter or level of education…it should enable research workers to collaborate in the quest for a Common Core of Training….But this is not the only level at which it is possible to identify behavioral or affective/cognitive approaches common to different processes of teacher educator training.

COORDINATED TRAINING OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS; CASE STUDIES: Malaysia, Malta, Poland 1978 UNESCO DOC.

PAUWERT: THE TRAINING OF SENIOR AND SUPERVISORY EDUCATIONAL PERSONNEL. EDUCATIONAL STUDIES AND DOCS. UNESCO.

“How can the inspector be made an agent of change?

One of the major difficulties which the country encounters in the implementation of t raining process and the reform of educational system is the coordination of all types of training and all available resources: the training of teachers, training in the management of cooperatives trained in the domestic economy, training for agriculture development, training in schools required for industrial development…everything under the sun (C.I. last 4 words).

INSTRUCTIONAL GUIDE FOR TEACHER TRAINING

After Footnote 11 (location/ …pages)

“The emphasis of the workshop is upon the competencies expected of teacher educator as a professional. These competencies are summed up in the Guide as follows:

COMMON TRAINING:

• Instructional Skills: Teacher will be required to plan effective ? to secure student participation; to get and hold attention; individualize instruction; reinforce learning, engage more complex thinking abilities through questioning, give clear directions and provide for a two-way communication with students. This will require the teacher educator to enable the student teacher to acquire observational skills, to develop an understanding of inner-action analysis and to encourage the understanding of the teaching situation by engaging him in role playing , simulation, in Common Cores of micro-teaching and demonstration.

Common Cores of training may also be sought from the angle of training of various categories of personnel who are engaged in the idealism of the core of an educational system: for example the strengthening of education for understanding and human rights; the organization of relationships between education and communication (training in the use of media by teachers) the coordination of formal and non-formal education; the interaction between education and productive work; and population education. Footnote #16. Vandevelde, Lj83, Popham, W.J. 1975.

THE ESTABLISHMENT OF COMMON CORES: Why, For Whom, How?
App. 1, of doc. Already cited (19)

The establishment of a Common Core depends on regional, national and local characteristics and can take as its starting point only the identification of specific problems.

PURPOSES OF COMMON CORES OF TRAINING:

3 Categories of Teaching Approaches:

Identify, determine and formulate educational intentions; select and implement the socio-affective/cognitive strategies assumed to be of such a nature as to achieve the aims set;

Design and apply techniques of evaluation making it possible to verify whether the stated objectives have been effectively attained.

Charlotte’s note: CONTROL (GET OFF HOOK!)

“CONSEQUENTLY, CONTRARY TO CERTAIN CONVICTIONS AND EVEN TO CERTAIN PRACTICES, IT IS NOT THE JOB EITHER OF THE TEACHER EDUCATOR OR OF THE PERSON WHO TRAINS HIM EITHER TO DETERMINE OR TO DEFINE GOALS.”

Taken in shorthand, transcribed, and typed by Charlotte Iserbyt 5/27/15

For critical information regarding UNESCO and its communist origins, development of curriculum, teacher training, etc. click on: In The Presence of Our Enemies

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Published in: on July 30, 2016 at 4:15 pm  Leave a Comment  

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