Maine State Bar Association – 100 Years of Law & Justice (1891-1991)

Click here.

(*note – the missing page numbers were blank pages.)

 
This Maine Bar Assoc. publication is a must read.

P. 33 – The Maine Bar admits “the younger members of the Bar had virtually no training in common law procedure.”
Maine is listed as a common law state.

P. 37 – The Maine Bar admits “a radical change taken place with respect to a fundamental body of learning, the old learning in common law pleading cast away and an entirely new system replacing it.”

P. 36- Maine Rules of Civil Procedure replaced common law pleadings.

This state cannot “cast away” the law due to the ignorance, uneducated attorneys.

The Maine Attorney General’s Office cannot “not recognize” common law. The A.G. and Asst. A.G.’s know, or should know, that common law is in effect on Maine. Attorneys within this office are members of the Maine State Bar Assoc. and they cannot deny what the BAR has published.

Published in: on August 4, 2013 at 10:45 pm  Comments (12)  

The URI to TrackBack this entry is: https://unmasker4maine.wordpress.com/2013/08/04/maine-state-bar-association-100-years-of-law-justice-1891-1991/trackback/

RSS feed for comments on this post.

12 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Interesting, here’s another link to this cult’s propaganda site that you might find of interest: http://www.mainebar.org/images/oyo2011final.pdf

    It’s another example of how these cult practitioners are trying to mold the minds of the youth of this country.

    • Thank you!

      • Well, Lise will have fun with this one…..

    • Nelson, “this page has either been moved or deleted.”

  2. Good stuff

  3. Hi!

    This booklet about the Maine State Bar Association is quite revealing.

    Thank you!

    Lise from Maine

  4. Hi!

    In that 2011 Maine State Bar Association it states that the District and Probate courts do not have juries in them.

    NO judge has ever been given the delegation of authority to decide a case especially in the district courts that were created in 1961 which is a state-wide court acting FOR the state.

    I don’t know if probate courts ever used juries.

    Does anyone know?

    Thank you!

    Lise from Maine

  5. In Nebraska; Chapter 25, section 11; on juries, it indicates through two codes that juries in this state may in their discretion decide generally on all issue before them. The only issues before a ‘court’ being “law or fact”. This jury is determining the law for matters relating to money damages & real property. I can provide the actual cites and I may have already posted them in the past through this bloghouse.

  6. Hi James Bethel,

    I would appreciate it if you can provide the actual cites which would give us more information and that we can learn from them.

    Thank you!

    Lise from Maine

  7. I’m afraid you mistake “common law procedure” i.e., pleading rules — with substantive law. None of the latter was “cast away.” These references are to mere procedures rules. The common law is alive and well in Maine, as any attorney will tell you.

    • For clarification…common law IS in force and effect on Maine, and please do let us know of just ONE attorney who will tell us so and is not afraid to use the common law in an action. (A couple of case examples – In Maine, conceptions of personal and property rights are based on the common law. Wheeler v Phoenix Indemnity Co. (1949) 144 Me. 105, 65 A.2d 10. Common law is in force in Maine. Sacknoff v Sacknoff (1932) 131 Me. 280, 161 A. 669; Copp v Paradis (1931) 130 Me. 464, 157 A. 228).

      However, the Maine Attorney General’s Office does not “recognize” common law and will not uphold common law (unless they want to – it is “selective” with the A.G.). Maine courts (judges-“hearing officers”) follow suit. Attorneys in this office are members of the Maine State Bar Assoc. and they cannot deny what the BAR has published.

      On P. 33 – The Maine Bar admits “the younger members of the Bar had virtually no training in common law procedure.”

      “There was indeed a lively interest in changing the common law pleadings and procedure. The younger members of the Bar had had virtually no training in common law procedure. Most law schools did not offer a course in it. Harvard Law School, for instance, based its course in civil procedure upon the Federal Rules of Procedure. Owing to this general lack of training in common law procedure, the Maine Bar Examiners had given up conducting an integrated examination in common law pleading and had downgraded it to a question or two in the miscellaneous part of the examinations.”

      On P. 37 – The Maine Bar admits “a radical change taken place with respect to a fundamental body of learning, the old learning in common law pleading cast away and an entirely new system replacing it.”

      People in the know understand common law cannot be “cast aside.” An ongoing controversy on this state is the peoples’ knowledge of common law vs. the uneducated/uninformed attorneys on this issue. The BAR admits their “club members” have “no training in common law procedure.”

      The BAR has not “pulled the wool” over the eyes of people who understand common law. Now let’s get Maine’s constitutional officers to understand. Reading this BAR publication is a good place for them to start….second to listening to the people who have researched this issue.

  8. I think it may be the same in Massachusetts. My Attorney here told me that he only knows the state Statutes, that’s Civil not Common Law. Many young Lawyers may not “believe” in our Founding Fathers and The Constitution, even though they take the Oath. One in Mass. told me himself!! He is in his 30’s. Margot


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: